When it comes to buying beef, many people are often torn between flank steak and skirt steak. These two cuts are both popular for their flavor, tenderness, and versatility in the kitchen.

However, one question that often arises is which of these cuts is cheaper? In this article, we’ll explore the differences between flank steak and skirt steak and determine which one is more affordable.

Flank Steak

Flank steak is a long and flat cut of beef that comes from the abdominal muscles of the cow. It’s a lean cut with little marbling but packs a lot of flavor. Flank steak is often used in dishes like fajitas, stir-fries, and carne asada.

Price

The price of flank steak varies depending on where you live and where you buy it. On average, a pound of flank steak can cost anywhere from $8 to $12 per pound.

Skirt Steak

Skirt steak is another flat cut of beef that comes from the diaphragm muscles of the cow. It’s a bit tougher than flank steak but has a rich beefy flavor that makes it a favorite among many chefs. Skirt steak is often used in dishes like tacos, fajitas, and carne asada.

The price of skirt steak also varies depending on where you live and where you buy it. On average, a pound of skirt steak can cost anywhere from $10 to $16 per pound.

Which Is Cheaper?

Based on the average prices mentioned above, it’s clear that flank steak is generally cheaper than skirt steak. However, this doesn’t mean that one cut is better than the other. Both cuts have their unique characteristics that make them suitable for different recipes.

When deciding which cut to use for your recipe, consider your budget and the flavor profile you’re going for. If you’re looking for a leaner and more affordable option, go for flank steak. If you’re willing to spend a bit more for a richer beefy flavor, skirt steak is the way to go.

Conclusion

In conclusion, both flank steak and skirt steak are delicious cuts of beef that are perfect for various dishes. While flank steak is generally cheaper than skirt steak, both cuts have their unique qualities that make them worth trying. So next time you’re at the grocery store, don’t be afraid to experiment with these two cuts and see which one works best for your recipe.