Are you confused about whether flank steak and skirt steak are the same thing? You’re not alone!

These two cuts of beef are often used interchangeably, which can make it difficult to know what you’re getting when you order one or the other. But fear not, we’re here to clear up any confusion.

What is Flank Steak?

Flank steak comes from the abdominal muscles of the cow and is a lean cut of meat. It’s long and flat with a pronounced grain, making it perfect for marinating and grilling. Flank steak is also commonly used in dishes like fajitas and stir-fries.

What is Skirt Steak?

Skirt steak, on the other hand, comes from the diaphragm muscles of the cow. It’s a tougher cut than flank steak but has more flavor. Skirt steak is often used in dishes like carne asada and bibimbap.

So, Are They The Same?

While flank steak and skirt steak are both cuts of beef that come from similar areas on the cow, they are not exactly the same thing. They have different textures, flavors, and culinary uses.

  • Texture: Flank steak is leaner than skirt steak and has a more pronounced grain.
  • Flavor: Skirt steak has more marbling than flank steak, which gives it a richer flavor.
  • Culinary Uses: Flank steak is commonly used in dishes like fajitas and stir-fries, while skirt steak is often used for carne asada or Korean BBQ.

How to Cook Flank Steak vs Skirt Steak

Both flank steak and skirt steak benefit from being marinated before cooking to help tenderize the meat and add flavor. But when it comes to cooking methods, the two cuts are best prepared differently.

Flank steak: Flank steak is best cooked quickly over high heat, such as on a grill or in a cast-iron skillet. It’s important to let flank steak rest before slicing against the grain to ensure it stays tender.

Skirt steak: Skirt steak benefits from a longer cooking time at a lower temperature. It’s often grilled or seared on high heat first before being finished in the oven or slow cooker.

Conclusion

While flank steak and skirt steak are not exactly the same thing, they do share some similarities. Both cuts of beef come from similar areas on the cow and benefit from being marinated before cooking.

However, they have different textures, flavors, and culinary uses. So next time you’re at the butcher counter or ordering at a restaurant, you’ll know exactly what you’re getting!