If you’re a meat lover, you must have come across the terms “flank steak” and “hanger steak” on restaurant menus or at the butcher shop. These two cuts of beef are often compared to each other due to their similar texture and taste.

However, are they the same thing? Let’s dig deeper into this topic.

What is Flank Steak?

Flank steak is a long, flat cut of beef that comes from the abdominal muscles of the cow. It is a lean cut of meat with a grainy texture and rich flavor.

Flank steak is best cooked quickly over high heat and sliced against the grain before serving. It is commonly used in dishes like fajitas, stir-fry, and sandwiches.

What is Hanger Steak?

Hanger steak, also known as butcher’s steak or hanging tenderloin, is a cut of beef that comes from the diaphragm muscles of the cow. It is a thick, rectangular-shaped cut with a coarse grain and intense beefy flavor.

Hanger steak needs to be cooked carefully to avoid becoming tough or Chewy. It’s usually marinated before being grilled or broiled and served as a standalone dish with sauces or toppings.

Are Flank Steak and Hanger Steak the Same?

No, flank steak and hanger steak are not the same thing. Although they share some similarities like texture and flavor profile, they come from different parts of the cow’s body and require different cooking methods for optimal taste.

Differences between Flank Steak and Hanger Steak

  • Flank steak comes from the abdominal muscles while hanger steak comes from diaphragm muscles.
  • Flank steak is leaner than hanger steak.
  • Hanger steak has more marbling, making it juicier and more tender than flank steak.
  • Flank steak is best cooked quickly over high heat while hanger steak needs to be cooked carefully to avoid becoming tough or Chewy.

Conclusion

In summary, while both flank steak and hanger steak are delicious cuts of beef, they are not the same thing. Flank steak is leaner and best cooked quickly over high heat, while hanger steak has more marbling and requires careful cooking to avoid toughness. Understanding the differences between these two cuts can help you choose the right one for your dish and cooking preferences.